Work...

I've had a clunky year of sorts.  Working on a new workshop space, personal work, commissions and a couple small projects.  Not as much as it sounds really. 

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Painting courses Summer 2016 at Gage Academy of Art

Acrylic Still-Life Painting — Huddleston
Tuesday 6/28-7/26

Dates: 06/28/2016 - 07/26/2016
Meets on: Tuesday
Time: 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Tuition: $245
Level: All Levels


Acrylic Portrait Painting — Huddleston
Tuesday 6/28-7/26

Dates: 06/28/2016 - 07/26/2016
Meets on: Tuesday
Time: 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Tuition: $255
Level: All Levels


These courses are designed to introduce basic principles of acrylic painting to students with little or no previous painting experience. Students will learn about palettes, supports, mediums, basic color principles and basic composition. 

Students will also explore color, texture and transparent/opaque use of acrylic paint in producing a contemporary realist painting. While working to gain an understanding of the painting medium, you will also be challenged to translate concepts into visual images that work. 

Taught with an emphasis on a contemporary approach to realism/representational painting. The utilization of photographs and sketches to build a painting will also be taught.

Registration opens 05/09/2016 more information at Gage Academy of Art

"Two Painters: Kathy Gore-Fuss and Amy Huddleston"

Prographica / KDR May 7 - June 30

Both Kathy Gore Fuss and Amy Huddleston work from direct observation, but they use this traditional tool very differently. One would never confuse their two bodies of work.

Four years ago Kathy Gore Fuss began spending much of her painting time out in the forests around her Olympia home rather than in the studio. She was curious how working from direct observation would change her painting. It has sharpened her eye and guided her hand as well as deepened and expanded her narrative vision of the forest. This is perhaps especially true in the work on view as Gore Fuss has, for the past year, filled the unique role of artist in residence at the Port of Olympia, and as such she has had access to the loading facilities and crews of Chinese and Japanese ships that dominate the shipping of lumber at West Coast ports. Her narrative begins in the forest and follows through to the loading dock. While the narrative content, explicit and implied, is there, her intent is not to document but rather to use the “Industrial Forest” as a vehicle for her ideas about painting. Gore Fuss understands that her narrative serves the painting, not the other way around. These paintings are “stand-alone works” and compelling as the story is, do not require the narrative to find meaning as works of art.

Amy Huddleston writes: “Two years ago I decided to work entirely from observation, with a muted and limited palette.  I learned a great deal through this work; which was based on measuring in order to help me better understand spatial relationships. I felt a strong desire to see what this could bring to my work.” Huddleston’s passion is for observation detached from narrative. Because she knows how to paint well indeed, her straightforward  approach will have its rewards, among them, allowing psychological expression to be a by-product, rather than the intention of her efforts. This compelling subjective expression, while it arrives without invitation, does become a significant aspect of her work.

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Summer Courses

I will be teaching 2 beginning acrylic classes this summer. Classes will be held at Gage Academy of Art. There will be two sessions, 1:30 to 4:30 and 6:30 to 9:30, both on Tuesdays, June 28th through July 26th. More info when the summer catalog is finished.

 

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Next Show

"Two Painters: Kathy Gore Fuss & Amy Huddleston", May 7 – July 2, 2016, Reception: Sat., May 7, 2 - 4pm

DIRECT OBSERVATION: TWO APPROACHES

Both Kathy Gore Fuss and Amy Huddleston work from direct observation, but they use this traditional tool very differently. One would never confuse their two bodies of work. 

Four years ago Kathy Gore Fuss began spending much of her painting time out in the forests around her Olympia home rather than in the studio. She was curious how working from direct observation would change her painting. It has sharpened her eye and guided her hand as well as deepened and expanded her narrative vision of the forest. This is perhaps especially true in the work on view as Gore Fuss has, for the past year, filled the unique role of artist in residence at the Port of Olympia, and as such she has had access to the loading facilities and crews of Chinese and Japanese ships that dominate the shipping of lumber at West Coast ports. Her narrative begins in the forest and follows through to the loading dock. While the narrative content, explicit and implied, is there, her intent is not to document but rather to use the “Industrial Forest” as a vehicle for her ideas about painting. Gore Fuss understands that her narrative serves the painting, not the other way around. These paintings are “stand-alone works” and compelling as the story is, do not require the narrative to find meaning as works of art. 

Amy Huddleston writes: “Two years ago I decided to work entirely from observation, with a muted and limited palette.  I learned a great deal through this work; which was based on measuring in order to help me better understand spatial relationships. I felt a strong desire to see what this could bring to my work.” Huddleston’s passion is for observation detached from narrative. Because she knows how to paint well indeed, her straightforward  approach will have its rewards, among them, allowing psychological expression to be a by-product, rather than the intention of her efforts. This compelling subjective expression, while it arrives without invitation, does become a significant aspect of her work.

Observing Observing (a white cup), at Prographica

Opening reception: September 12, 2015, 2 - 4 pm, 3419 E Denny Way, Seattle, WA

Curated by Eric Elliott, Michael Howard & Norman Lundin.

Artists included in the exhibition are: Brian Blackham, Fred Birchman, Sarah Bixler, David Campbell, Kimberly Clark, Joe Crookes, Dean Fisher, Cable Griffith, Laura Hamje, Kenny Harris, Amy Huddleston, Carrie Kapp, Matt Klos, Kathy Liao, Judy Nimtz, Elizabeth Ockwell, Anne Petty, Bob Schlegel, Bill Sharp, Graham Shutt, Jordan Wolfson & Evelyn Woods. 

Cable Griffith is shown courtesy of G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle. 

This is my painting for the show. "Night Cup", oil on linen, 14.5x22 inches.